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Author Topic: Post your working SD cards here!  (Read 7228 times)
Sheevaplugger
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« on: August 31, 2009, 04:19:22 PM »

Hi,

I thought we could compile a list of confirmed to work SD cards, since the Sheevaplug is pretty picky with them.
Preferably model, brand and where it can be found.

So post them here!

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westyd1982
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« Reply #1 on: August 31, 2009, 09:21:32 PM »

SanDisk UltraII SDHC 4GB  - Running Debian with SDIO patch to u-boot.

Transcend 16 GB SDHC Class 6 Flash Memory Card TS16GSDHC6E - Purchased from Amazon.com - Running Debian with SDIO patch to u-boot.  I had trouble with this card at first, but I think I messed up the plug first.  This card worked fine after I did the USB recovery procedure to the plug and the loaded the patched u-boot.
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slasher302
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« Reply #2 on: September 01, 2009, 08:03:24 AM »

I'm using a SanDisk Ultra II 2.0GB (the kind that flips open with a USB connector).  The SheevaPlug reads it just fine in the SDIO slot and USB.
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riel
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« Reply #3 on: September 01, 2009, 04:30:27 PM »

sandisk 2gb card working just fine.
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birdman
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« Reply #4 on: September 01, 2009, 06:00:12 PM »

Verbatim. Class 6.  8GB SDHC Pro.
Working fine.
Running the rootfs (but still booting from NAND at present).
« Last Edit: September 02, 2009, 04:34:05 PM by birdman » Logged

CqCn
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« Reply #5 on: September 02, 2009, 07:52:26 AM »

I usually go for the lesser brand ones --- I am in the semiconductor area.  For compatibility when used in non windows system (especially if it has to be reformatted as for our use in the Plug, and when booting is needed) generic ones seems to be the least troublesome.  Many of the brands try to distinguish themselves with features, especially the security oriented ones, making their interface less standard.  Many brands use the same 3 or 4 brand chips internally, sometimes with tiny customization -- ip cores.  However some vendors, especially totally generic ones from Asia, may be using some reject chips with serious flaws.  I am in the Silicon Valley, now a days I buy them only if we agree to take them back if returned within 2 days.

All of the following work here, he higher speed last two need bootdelay if used as the bootable rootfs.

SSDCards  (some are micro ones -- small formfactor, with an adapter)
MicroCener 2GB (have 2)
MicroCenter 1GB
Kensington 4GB
Kensingon 2GB
Polaroid 2GB
Patrist 4GB

I have a number of usb sticks too, though have not tried them in bootable mode.

I would later come back with a quick speed testing script(s)


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Cordially, CqCn

mbohupa
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« Reply #6 on: September 02, 2009, 02:04:07 PM »

Kingston 1GB SD
Sandisk 4GB Extreme III SDHC Class 6 (30 MB/s edition)

The Sandisk Extreme III flies!!

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rc3
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« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2009, 10:51:28 AM »

Kingston 2G: works flawlessly. Running debian lenny and boot from SD card.

Sandisk 16GB Ultra II: Very hard to get it to work --- so far I am only succeeded with 2.6.30-rc1 kernel (in which iptables NAT is missing). 2.6.30-rc2, rc3, rc4, rc5 all failed, either compiled by myself or download from http://sheeva.with-linux.com/sheeva/

Sandisk 2GB SD card (http://www.amazon.com/SanDisk-Memory-SDSDB-2048-A11-Retail-Package/dp/B0009RGLSE) works as well.
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reksa
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« Reply #8 on: September 04, 2009, 08:36:06 PM »

Patriot 16G Class 6 (PSF16GSDHC6-PC) Works ok

But it did take 3 hours to do the mkfs (non bootable)
Is that normal?

-mike
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reksa
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« Reply #9 on: September 05, 2009, 12:47:39 AM »

Update on the Patriot 16G

1) I have problems if I remove and reinsert the card while powered.
     It wont read the card when reinserted, rebooting doesnt help
     and the partition table is blank.  I then  have to reformat
     My fstab is: /dev/mmcblk0p1  /mnt/sdcard  auto  rw,defaults,sync 0 0
     Does the plug allow SDcards to removed and inserted while powered?

2) mkfs -t ext3 takes 3 hours
    mkfs -t ext2 takes 3 mins
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CqCn
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« Reply #10 on: September 05, 2009, 08:02:37 AM »

reksa, IMHO, unplugging an sdcard while running, is at best a gamble; it is a bit like: most often you would get to the other side when walking across a not so busy road even if you did not look left or right. Depending on the activity level, and the type fs, most times we may not experience a problem even if a set of files got corrupted, since that file may not be needed by us for sometime to come.

I think, if you first issue the command 'poweroff' and wait ~30secs, your card safety is immensely improved.
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Cordially, CqCn

reksa
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« Reply #11 on: September 10, 2009, 09:07:17 PM »

Yes but, all the pdas I have owned including the wonderful
Linux SL5500 Zaurus.   They all supported hot-swapping of SD cards.
I have never had a case where an SD card is wiped clean when
I reinsert it while powered.

-mike
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CqCn
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« Reply #12 on: September 10, 2009, 09:21:38 PM »

Well, hotswapping data cards when the appropriate fs is used may not be same as pulling out a card from where the os is running, especially when it is ext2. 
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adapted.cat
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« Reply #13 on: September 19, 2009, 03:58:09 AM »

1) I have problems if I remove and reinsert the card while powered.
...
2) mkfs -t ext3 takes 3 hours

Before you remove your card, run "umount /dev/mmcblk0p1" - this will flush any buffers to the card itself. Don't be surprised if the umount takes a while - Linux keeps a lot cached in memory.

Internally under the FTL, your SD card probably uses a wear-leveling log structured filesystem, so I really don't see the benefit of using ext3 (adds its own different kind of journal) over ext2 for SD cards. Stick with ext2 if it works for you.
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raj2009
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« Reply #14 on: September 20, 2009, 03:22:36 AM »

Tried with a generic 8gb one from "A Data" and worked fine.
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